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Bulls on Wall Street: Stop Guessing. Start Trading.

vega

Last definition over the series! We are back on the Greeks! Yesterday you learned about implied volatility and why you need to understand the concept for buying and selling contracts. Today’s topic is another topic that is directly related to implied volatility: Vega.

What is Vega?

Vega is simply the value an option price will change with a 1% move in implied volatility. Like with other greeks, it doesn’t have any effect on the intrinsic value of options but is an indicator of potential future value. It is only a measure of the potential fluctuation in contract value with a change in volatility.  

In general, the more time remaining until contract expiration, the higher the vega. When you are far away from a contract's expiration, a greater proportion of the option’s premium is accounted for by time value, and the time value is sensitive to changes in volatility. Remember that a portion of a contract's premium is made up of time value, and this proportion changes as you approach the expiration date.  

Example

Let’s examine a 30-day option on SQ stock like we did yesterday with a $50 strike price and the stock trading exactly at $50. Vega for this option could be .05. In other words, the value of the option might go up $.05 if implied volatility increases one point, and the value of the option might go down $.05 if implied volatility decreases one point.

If you looked at the 365-day at-the-money SQ option, Vega could be as high $.30 meaning the value of the contract could fluctuate by as much as $.30 when implied volatility drops by a point.  

Why It Matters

As IV increases, the value of the options contract will increase as well. This is because the anticipated volatility would cause the stock to potentially increase in even more value, causing the value of its options to appreciate. When volatility drops, we subtract vega due to the drop in IV.

Vega and implied volatility are more predictable than a stock’s direction because it is so correlated with time. Since Vega is related to implied volatility, it is a measure of the market's expectation of a change of volatility in the time period of the contract. If you’re feeling confused, don’t worry: We’ve got more educational material to help you out!

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If you still feel baffled by the terminology and are interested in learning more about options and learning proven options trading strategies, you should check out my upcoming live 6-day live trading bootcamp. It will teach you everything you need to know about how to trade options successfully.

C

About BB from Houston

Brian is a successful equities and options trader. He completed our course back in 2015 and has seen great success. Brian is also an engineer with a wife and 6 year old son that he now teaches how to recognize stocks patters. Brian graduated with an MBA from Ohio State University and is an US Army Veteran.

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